Help

Shop

Understand the science behind Lingo

Know what’s happening with your metabolism – in real time.

Buy Lingo

Understand the science behind Lingo

Know what’s happening with your metabolism – in real time.

The Science
The Science
Glucose fuels all that you do

Glucose fuels all that you do 

Glucose fluctuations are hard to track. Some spikes are good. Some come with negative effects. And it usually takes a glucose science expert to crack the code. That’s where Lingo comes in. The Lingo biosensor and app work together to translate your glucose patterns and deliver real-time, personalised coaching to help you feel your best

Glucose fuels all that you do

Steady glucose equals a healthy metabolism

Metabolism
What is metabolism?

Metabolism is all the biochemical reactions occurring in the body, and one key role of these reactions is converting food and drinks into energy. Your body uses this energy for vital functions such as breathing, brain power, digestion, repairing muscle, and so much more.

Glucose & metabolism
Glucose & metabolism

As your body breaks down food for energy, one of the nutrients that’s absorbed  is glucose. When your glucose is on the rise, your body works to clear this rush of glucose, storing it for future use either as glycogen or fat. When your glucose begins to crash, your body breaks down this stored fuel for energy. 

The benefits of glucose
The benefits of glucose

Consistently steady glucose is one sign of good metabolic health. And improving your metabolic health can help you boost your energy, get better sleep, improve your mood, sharpen your focus, manage your cravings, and more.

Your glucose patterns

Different meals and activities can spike your glucose. Too many intense spikes can lead to fatigue, brain fog, restless sleep, poor mood, and constant cravings. But not all spikes are the same – everyone’s glucose reacts differently.

Lingo bridges the gap, helping bring complex glucose insights to an everyday audience. The Lingo biosensor, app, and proprietary spike detection algorithm work together to translate your daily glucose patterns into one simple number: The Lingo Count. As different foods or activities impact your glucose, Lingo responds with real-time coaching to help you adjust your habits, stick to your health goals, and keep your glucose steady.

Explore the Lingo benefits

Lingo personal metabolic coaching

The inaccessibility of deep glucose insights is exactly why we created Lingo. Lingo puts the power in your hands, coaching you as you learn to manage your glucose and retrain your metabolism.

Managing your glucose

Managing your glucose

How it works

How it works

How to read a stream

How to read a stream

Pioneered by Abbott. Designed for you.

Pioneered by Abbott. Designed for you.

Lingo is developed by Abbott, the world’s no. 1  leader in continuous glucose monitoring technology. Its ground-breaking technology is used by 5 million people every day. 

 

For over 135 years, Abbott has created life-changing health technologies, and Lingo is the newest in its acclaimed history. Designed by distinguished teams of scientists, experts, and dietitians, Lingo is here to help you take control of your metabolic health.

Pioneered by Abbott. Designed for you.

Meet the experts behind Lingo

Building the most impactful, empowering, and accurate product we can isn’t possible without the right people. Get to know some of the experts that helped make Lingo possible.

Benefits to improve your well-being. For good.

Abbott’s market-leading glucose monitoring technology and our proprietary Lingo Count algorithm combine to help you better understand your metabolism and live a healthy lifestyle.

Boost energy

Struggling with low energy? Managing your glucose curve can be an effective way to improve your energy levels. People following a low glycaemic diet have reported feeling 20% less fatigue than those following a high glycaemic diet.*

Manage hunger

Are you really hungry? Research shows that seeing your real-time glucose data could help you understand the difference between feeling hungry and just a passing craving .*

Improve mood

Can you steady your mood? Balancing your glucose can curb a poor mood and improve your mood. One study found that people who ate a high-glycaemic diet had a 55% higher report of poor mood as compared to people who ate a low-glycaemic diet.*

Sleep better

Could you be more rested? Small adjustments to your daily routine can impact sleep. Evidence is emerging from clinical studies that adopting habits known to support steady glucose levels, may lead to better sleep . In turn, better sleep quality may also help you keep your glucose steady.*

Increase focus

Stay focused by analysing your food and lifestyle habits and managing your glucose levels. One study of more than 3,000 young adults showed that those with unsteady glucose levels had diminished memory and processing speed 25 years later.*

Explore more articles

card image

What is a glucose spike? Definition, causes and management

Glucose spikes: definition, causes and management After you eat, your body breaks down the food or drink to be used for energy or stored for later use. Of the three macronutrients — carbohydrates, protein, and fat — carbohydrates are the quickest to digest. (1,2) Carbohydrates are converted into glucose, which is one of your body’s main sources of energy. Glucose circulates via the bloodstream to get into cells where it’s used for energy. Any glucose not being used as an immediate source of fuel is shuttled to the liver, muscles, or fat cells and stored for later use. Sometimes the amount of glucose circulating in your body surpasses what is needed for energy. When glucose becomes too concentrated in the blood, this is referred to as a glucose spike or a blood sugar spike. Some degree of rise in glucose is completely normal, but consistent spikes and the crashes that often follow can negatively impact your health and long-term well-being. Even if you don’t have diabetes or pre-diabetes, these constant ups and downs can take a toll, with research suggesting an increased risk for developing insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular issues (3,4). Glucose spikes can also be caused by lifestyle factors such as stress or follow a poor night’s sleep. They can also occur during intense exercise, but in this case, a spike is a good thing. You can take steps to limit or avoid glucose spikes and temper them once they start. Better glucose management can benefit your health in a number of ways, including how you feel, your energy levels, hunger and cravings, sleep, mental focus, and more. Here, we break down what a glucose spike is, what causes it, what they feel like, and how to avoid them in the future. Once you get a better understanding of how glucose works in your body, you can take steps to make healthier choices that will improve your well-being. What is a glucose spike? A glucose spike, also known as a blood sugar spike, is a sharp, marked rise in the amount of glucose in your blood, typically followed by a comparable decline, also known as a crash. While it is normal for your glucose to rise and fall many times throughout the day, a true spike is different. Spikes occur for a myriad of reasons, most commonly after eating an influx of carbs and/or sugar (more on that later) but can also arise due to physiological and psychological stress, intense exercise, dehydration, caffeine intake, certain medications, and other factors. When you have access to monitor your glucose levels with a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) like Lingo, you can see your glucose value throughout the day. Metabolically healthy individuals should strive to stay within 70-140mg/dL (3.9-7.8 mmol/L) and those with tighter glucose control will strive to stay within the range of 70-100mg/dL (3.9-5.6mmol/L). Most healthy individuals stay within the wider range most of the time. It’s typical to be out of the 70-140 mg/dl (3.9-7.8mmol/L) range for just 30 minutes to 2 hours a day. (7) Sharp upticks above your average glucose value or above the recommended range are commonly defined as spikes. These excursions look like steep mountains on your Lingo glucose graph. Your goal is to stay within the range of 70-140mg/dL (3.9-7.8mmol/L) most of the time and minimise the occurrence and severity of spikes. With Lingo, coaching prompts, your Lingo Count, and Lingo glucose graph can help you understand when you’re spiking so you can begin to discover the why behind your spikes and make changes to stay steady. What causes a glucose spike? A glucose spike typically happens after eating something particularly carb-heavy, especially if the carbohydrates are mostly simple carbs (e.g. white bread, pasta, bagel) and sugar. A glucose spike can also occur if you eat carbohydrates by themselves; pairing a carb with a source of protein or fat can help limit the glucose impact and reduce the risk of a spike. High-intensity exercise can also cause a glucose spike because it increases adrenaline (the fight-or-flight hormone), which signals to your body that it’s time to break down liver glycogen to glucose. This quick influx of fuel can spike your glucose, but as mentioned, a spike is a good thing in this instance. In the same way that exercise spikes your heart rate temporarily but provides benefit in the long run, a temporary blood glucose rise with exercise is an example of hormesis, which is a short-term stress that enables long-term adaptation. Other lifestyle factors may influence glucose, such as stress and poor sleep. Like with intense exercise, an increase in stress triggers the stress hormones cortisol and adrenaline, which can raise your glucose as your body needs quick energy to enter into fight-or-flight mode. Not getting enough sleep can disrupt your body’s ability to use glucose, causing future health concerns. (5) Over time this may lead to metabolic issues like prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, a disorder in which your body becomes resistant to insulin and loses its ability to properly remove glucose from the blood into your cells to use for energy. What does a glucose spike feel like? While a glucose spike may feel differently for each person, some common symptoms include tiredness, thirst, and hunger. Alternatively, some people may be asymptomatic and not notice when they are spiking. As your glucose rises, your body releases insulin to manage the extra glucose. As insulin circulates, your glucose rapidly lowers, often leading to a sharp crash. When this happens, your body typically craves more simple carbohydrates and sugar for a quick energy boost, and if you answer the craving, the spike-crash cycle continues. (6) Another major sign of a glucose spike followed by a crash is the feeling of being “hangry” (hungry + angry) in which you may feel irritable while also feeling hungry. This feeling often stems from a drop in glucose that signals an increase in ghrelin, known as the hunger hormone. This triggers a cascade of other hormones including the stress hormone cortisol, which explains why you feel irritable or impulsive in addition to physical hunger pangs. While hanger caused by low glucose can happen when you undereat or go too long in between meals, it can also happen in high glycaemic diets in which your glucose levels are constantly spiking and crashing. After you eat something with a lot of carbs and notice symptoms of a spike, incorporating movement may help temper the spike. A brisk 10-minute walk after eating may be all you need to prevent or lessen a glucose spike. Other quick bursts of exercise can also help, such as 10 minutes of bodyweight squats, jumping jacks, lunges, and calf raises. It’s a good idea to drink plenty of water and opt for something with more protein at your next meal. What is the impact of glucose spikes? In the short term, glucose spikes can cause hunger, cravings, feelings of fatigue, impact mood, and interfere with your sleep. While you’re likely to notice these effects as they're happening, there is impact behind the scenes, too. Glucose spikes can significantly impact the health of blood vessels and cells, with chronic spikes setting the stage for metabolic dysfunction. Elevated glucose increases your risk for developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, causes inflammation, and impacts your blood vessels, which can lead to cardiovascular issues like heart disease. (3,4) This is why it’s important to limit the number and size of glucose spikes that occur. Wearing a continuous glucose monitor like Lingo can help you learn about your glucose and track your spikes. Lingo provides real time data and coaching to help you understand how your habits impact your glucose and metabolic health. With Lingo, you’ll learn to limit the size and frequency spikes and make changes to improve your overall metabolic well-being, which can lead to more energy, better sleep, less hunger and cravings, and increased focus. How to avoid a glucose spike There are many ways to avoid a glucose spike naturally, and the best method is to be thoughtful with your food choices. Limit foods that are common sources of spikes such as refined carbohydrates, sugars, and sugary beverages, and instead opt for more complex carbohydrates that have fibre such as vegetables, fresh fruit, brown rice, quinoa, and whole grain bread. Even better, pair your carbohydrates with a source of protein and/or fat for a macronutrient-balanced option. Other lifestyle habits that can help keep your glucose steady include getting quality sleep, staying physically active, drinking plenty of water, managing stress, and limiting alcohol. A final note from Lingo While glucose spikes are normal and occur in healthy individuals, there are plenty of health benefits to managing your glucose and reducing the size and frequency of spikes. Maintaining steady glucose can help improve your metabolic health and give you more energy, better sleep, reduce hunger and cravings, and boost mental focus. Using a continuous glucose monitor like Lingo can help you understand your habits and patterns and work towards limiting glucose spikes. Lingo is not a medical device and not designed to treat or diagnose any disease or illness. If you have medical questions or concerns regarding your glucose, please contact your doctor.
By
Glucose 101
card image

Balance your glucose and level-up your overnight oats

Overnight oats are an easy, tasty breakfast option that can be prepped in advance. However, as oats are rich in carbohydrates, adding in the right toppings or mixtures is critical to keeping your glucose steady. Traditional oats with flavoured oat milk, raisins, banana, and honey is tasty, but contains lots of carbohydrates and minimal protein. This sweet start to your day can spike your glucose, leaving you feeling low energy, hungry, and irritable hours later. Carbohydrates paired with protein and fats give a smoother post-meal glucose curve than carbohydrates alone. (1) Pair wisely with these tasty swaps: Swap the oat milk for whole milk or full-fat Greek yoghurt. These contain more protein and less sugars. If you’re vegan, opt for a fortified, unsweetened nut-based milk, and double check the ingredients to avoid ones with added sugars. To increase the protein content, add high-quality protein powder to your porridge or mix in milled flaxseed, chia seeds, and chopped nuts. Instead of raisins, dried fruit, and bananas, add berries, as these are lower in sugar. A tasty recipe Use a ratio of 1:1 for the oats and liquid. Mix the ingredients, cover, and leave in the fridge overnight. Divide the mixture into containers if you’re on the move, or portion into bowls for the following days. Having some in the fridge means you can always start your day with steady glucose. By making these swaps, your breakfast will be far more satiating and improve your energy and focus. A great way to start all you days.
By
Fundamentals
Hunger
card image

The glucose and wellbeing connection

Steady glucose levels go well beyond lessening fatigue and giving you a better understanding of your hunger signals. While these effects may be felt soon after managing your glucose, the impact of living a steady lifestyle reaches far beyond one moment in time. Long-term benefits of glucose management are wide reaching, ranging from maintaining a healthy weight, to improved metabolic health, and even improved skin appearance. Conversely, unmanaged glucose levels tend to do the opposite. (1)(2)(3)(4) Lingo’s goal is to help you stay steady and find foods and habits that work with your metabolism and move you towards your goals. The simple step of tracking glucose can inspire changes, helping you reduce glucose spikes after meals and move towards a goal of a healthy weight and improved metabolic health. Simple lifestyle changes coupled with following the fundamentals, like including protein, fat, and fibre on your plate and enjoying these before high carbohydrate foods, can be a key step to take to reach a healthy weight. (1) When brain fog consistently wrecks your day, flattening your glucose curve may help. Steady energy and a balanced diet can lead to improved mood. This is because the roller coaster ride that follows a diet high in simple sugars and refined carbohydrates tends to spike your glucose. This spike most often leads to a sharp crash with energy, mood, and mental clarity not far behind. (2) Lastly, if skin appearance is paramount, following a balanced diet of protein, healthy fats, and fibrous carbohydrates can help. This approach can lead to fewer skin breakouts compared to individuals whose diets contain high amounts of simple carbohydrates. (3)(4) With all the compelling reasons to stay steady, hitting your Points target just might be more important than ever. So whichever reason, or reasons speaks to you, lean on Lingo to help move you towards steady and wellbeing.
By
Energy

Frequently Asked Questions

If you want to understand your metabolism and learn how to transform the way you feel, then Lingo is 100% for you.
However, the Lingo programme does not guarantee that everyone will achieve the same results as individual responses may vary. It’s always best to speak with your doctor or registered dietitian before starting any new diet or exercise regime.
Do not use if you are pregnant, dietary advice and Lingo counts may not be suitable for you if you are pregnant.
This product is not for people who are dealing with or have had eating disorders.
No, the Lingo system is not intended for medical use or for the management of diabetes. It is not intended for use in screening, diagnosis, treatment, cure, mitigation, prevention, or monitoring of diseases, including diabetes.
We use data from your biosensor to create your personalised training programme. We also use your product feedback anonymously to help us make the Lingo experience even better for you and others. For more information of how we process data and monitor communications, please see our privacy policy.
v1.0
app image for abbott below abbott icon
app image for lingo spelled out

Lingo

Help

apple app store
© 2024 Abbott. All rights reserved. Lingo and related marks are marks of the Abbott group of companies. Other marks are the property of their respective owners.Lingo Sensing Technology Unlimited Company is a private Unlimited Company with registered number 731659. Our registered office is at 70 Sir John Rogersons Quay, Dublin 2, D02 R296, Ireland.The Lingo system is not intended for medical use and is not intended for use in screening, diagnosis, treatment, cure, mitigation, prevention, or monitoring of diseases, including diabetes. The Lingo programme does not guarantee that everyone will achieve the same results as individual responses may vary. It is best to speak to your doctor for advise on starting any diet or exercise regime or if you have an eating disorder or a history of eating disorders.Do not use Lingo if you are pregnant. Dietary advice and Lingo Counts may not be suitable for you if you are pregnant.