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Biosensor

Get a deeper understanding of your glucose patterns and receive real-time insights, all conveniently accessible through your phone.

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Biosensor

Get a deeper understanding of your glucose patterns and receive real-time insights, all conveniently accessible through your phone.

Women wearing continuous glucose monitor on her upper arm
Women wearing continuous glucose monitor on her upper arm

Industry-leading technology

Lingo uses a biosensor based on Abbott's continuous glucose monitoring technology used by 5 million people around the world. Our team of experts leveraged Abbott’s decades of glucose research to build a biosensor and app that work together to help you live your healthiest lifestyle. 

 

The Lingo biosensor, app, and proprietary glucose spike detection algorithm work together to translate your daily glucose patterns into a simple Lingo Count system. As different foods or activities impact your glucose, Lingo responds with real-time coaching to help you adjust your habits, stick to your health goals, and keep your glucose steady

The Biosensor

Top Cover

Small design

Circuit Board

Custom chipset for glucose measurment with 14-day data continuosly streamed by Bluetooth

Bottom plastic housing

Sensor Tail

Thin and flexible filament

Adhesive

Medical-grade adhesive for a secure and comfortable fit

How does it work?

Applying the Biosensor

Sweat. Swim. Shower. Sleep. Repeat.

Your biosensor attaches painlessly to the back of your upper arm.

Your biosensor attaches painlessly to the back of your upper arm.

A thin, small, flexible filament sits just beneath the skin.

A thin, small, flexible filament sits just beneath the skin.

Your real-time glucose data streams directly to your phone.

Your real-time glucose data streams directly to your phone.

Apply your biosensor, and you’re good for two weeks – no charging necessary.

Apply your biosensor, and you’re good for two weeks – no charging necessary.

It’s waterproof. It’s sweat proof. It’s built for any day you throw at it.

It’s waterproof. It’s sweat proof. It’s built for any day you throw at it.

A brief history of glucose monitoring technology
A brief history of glucose monitoring technology
Glucose Spike Monitoring

From the first glucose monitor to Lingo

A brief history of glucose monitoring technology

Abbott was established in 1888, and in those 135 years, continuous glucose monitoring technology has taken giant leaps forward. 

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Glucose Spike Monitoring
Start your Lingo Journey
Start your Lingo Journey

Start your Lingo Journey today?

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Does metabolism actually slow down as we age? Here’s what research says

Your metabolism refers to all the biochemical reactions occurring in the body. One of these key reactions is converting food and drinks into energy. Your body uses this energy for vital functions such as breathing, brain power, digestion, repairing muscle, and so much more. (1) The rate at which it works to burn calories to keep your body going is known as metabolic rate. Metabolic rate is unique to every person, and is determined by genetics, age, muscle mass, and activity level. Increasing your metabolic rate is commonly referred to as “boosting metabolism,” meaning there is an increase in the number of calories your body needs while resting and moving. Having a fast metabolism means your body burns more calories. On the flip side, a slower metabolism means your body needs fewer calories and does not convert food into energy as efficiently. A common question about metabolism is: Does metabolism slow down with age? The answer is yes, your metabolism slows — but not as drastically as you may think. Keep reading to learn more about why metabolism slows with age, why it matters, and how a slower metabolism impacts your overall health. Does metabolism slow down with age? Here’s what research says Yes, research has proved that metabolism does slow down with age. While people may assume it’s a gradual decline after young adulthood, your metabolism doesn’t significantly slow down until later in life. From the age of about 20 to 60, your metabolic rate actually remains pretty consistent. A 2021 study published in Science found that metabolic rate starts to decrease after age 60, by about 0.7 percent each year. (2) A slow metabolism is often blamed for weight gain later in life. While science does confirm this is a factor for weight gain, there may be other reasons for gaining weight as you age, including decreased activity, loss of muscle mass, diet changes, and how we respond to the food we’re eating. (2,3) Why your metabolism slows down with age There are multiple reasons why your metabolism slows with age, which may lead to weight gain. As you get older, you lose more muscle mass. Studies have found that muscle mass decreases approximately 3–8% per decade after age 30, and after 60, the rate of decline goes even higher. (2) This impacts metabolism because muscle tissue burns more calories at rest than body fat. (3) Additionally, other hormonal changes, such as declining testosterone and estrogen may also play a role in decreasing muscle mass as we age. (3) As you age, you may also become less active, which can lead to weight gain. Not only do you burn fewer calories with less movement, but less movement can also contribute to the loss of muscle, which further decreases energy expenditure. (4) Another cause: as you age, the number of calories your body needs start to decline. (2) However, many factors may contribute to altered nutrition choices, including eating alone, difficulty cooking or feeding yourself, decreased appetite, or decreased access to healthy food. (4,5) Maintaining balanced glucose levels can also play a role in maintaining a healthy metabolism and weight. Some of the changes in muscle mass seen with ageing may be the result of insulin resistance as insulin plays a big role in the way our body digests and uses protein, along with its effects on glucose. (3) Additionally, steady glucose levels have been shown to positively impact your mood, energy levels, mental focus, sleep, and more. (6) Using a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) like Lingo can help you gain insights into your unique glucose responses and achieve improved metabolic health as you age. What is the impact of a slower metabolism? A slowing metabolism may lead to weight gain. However, there are ways you can combat this. Since muscle mass and hormonal changes (including insulin resistance) are some of the main drivers of metabolic changes as you age, both nutrition and physical activity are of the utmost importance: Prioritise protein: Start with a healthy diet that focuses on protein consumption. Older adults struggle to eat adequate protein and they need more protein to support healthy muscles. (3, 4) Doing so will benefit your glucose levels, insulin sensitivity, and support muscle tissue. (7, 8) Aim to eat 25-35 grams of high-quality protein at each meal. Stay active: Specifically, older adults should focus on strength training. The NHS recommends adults do 75 minutes of muscle strengthening activities at least 2 days a week, and 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise. (9, 10) If time or energy is limited, focusing on strength training and balance exercises will give you the most benefit. (11) Maintain steady glucose: As we age, the ability of your muscle cells and other tissues to respond to insulin is impaired. (3) Focusing on foods that keep glucose levels steady (and in turn, do not require large amounts of insulin) can help, like low-GI foods. Additionally, evidence shows that protein is better metabolized in older adults when consumed without carbohydrates. (3) Aim for meals with a quality source of protein, non-starchy veggies, and when eating carbs, make sure they are complex carbs like starchy vegetables or whole grains. A final note from Lingo While metabolism does slow down as you age, it’s often much later in life than many people expect. A slowing metabolism may be a factor for weight gain as you get older, but other factors like decreased activity, changes in appetite, loss of muscle mass, and dietary changes can also contribute. Using a continuous glucose monitor like Lingo can help you understand your habits and patterns and work towards limiting glucose (and insulin) spikes, which can help mitigate the metabolic changes seen with ageing.   Lingo is not a medical device and not designed to treat or diagnose any disease or illness. If you have medical questions or concerns regarding your glucose, please contact your doctor.
By
Glucose 101
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A day of eating with Lingo

Your needs change over time; even day-to-day, So, it can be helpful to have an idea of what a day in the life with Lingo might look like. Morning Start your day out on the right foot with a serving of our cheesy egg scramble and a light walk. Getting a few steps in before or after breakfast can help you balance your glucose response (1) Mid-Morning Don’t wait to eat until you’re starving. A simple snack, like one handful of pistachios (40 grams), can keep you full until lunch time. Afternoon Keep up the good work with one of our tuna and avocado salad wraps. This recipe is filled with hearty fats and vegetables to keep you full, flatten your glucose curve, and give you energy. Not only that, but the omega-3 fatty acids in the tuna and avocado fuel heart and brain health. (2) Evening End the day with our chicken stir fry with Pak Choy, broccoli, and brown rice. It will fill you up and has the right mix of protein, fat, and carbohydrates to help your body recover. Research also suggests that a meal high in protein, healthy fats, and moderate complex carbohydrates (like whole grains and pulses) may improve your sleep quality. (3) In addition to balanced meals and snacks like the ones above, you may need more nutrients after your workout – especially if you have a few hours to go before your next meal. A protein shake like the Ensure High Protein Shake is a great option for muscle recovery. Calorie needs vary among individuals, so speak with your physician or dietitian to determine how much food you should include in your day.
By
Fundamentals
Glucose 101
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What is a glucose spike? Definition, causes and management

Glucose spikes: definition, causes and management After you eat, your body breaks down the food or drink to be used for energy or stored for later use. Of the three macronutrients — carbohydrates, protein, and fat — carbohydrates are the quickest to digest. (1,2) Carbohydrates are converted into glucose, which is one of your body’s main sources of energy. Glucose circulates via the bloodstream to get into cells where it’s used for energy. Any glucose not being used as an immediate source of fuel is shuttled to the liver, muscles, or fat cells and stored for later use. Sometimes the amount of glucose circulating in your body surpasses what is needed for energy. When glucose becomes too concentrated in the blood, this is referred to as a glucose spike or a blood sugar spike. Some degree of rise in glucose is completely normal, but consistent spikes and the crashes that often follow can negatively impact your health and long-term well-being. Even if you don’t have diabetes or pre-diabetes, these constant ups and downs can take a toll, with research suggesting an increased risk for developing insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular issues (3,4). Glucose spikes can also be caused by lifestyle factors such as stress or follow a poor night’s sleep. They can also occur during intense exercise, but in this case, a spike is a good thing. You can take steps to limit or avoid glucose spikes and temper them once they start. Better glucose management can benefit your health in a number of ways, including how you feel, your energy levels, hunger and cravings, sleep, mental focus, and more. Here, we break down what a glucose spike is, what causes it, what they feel like, and how to avoid them in the future. Once you get a better understanding of how glucose works in your body, you can take steps to make healthier choices that will improve your well-being. What is a glucose spike? A glucose spike, also known as a blood sugar spike, is a sharp, marked rise in the amount of glucose in your blood, typically followed by a comparable decline, also known as a crash. While it is normal for your glucose to rise and fall many times throughout the day, a true spike is different. Spikes occur for a myriad of reasons, most commonly after eating an influx of carbs and/or sugar (more on that later) but can also arise due to physiological and psychological stress, intense exercise, dehydration, caffeine intake, certain medications, and other factors. When you have access to monitor your glucose levels with a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) like Lingo, you can see your glucose value throughout the day. Metabolically healthy individuals should strive to stay within 70-140mg/dL (3.9-7.8 mmol/L) and those with tighter glucose control will strive to stay within the range of 70-100mg/dL (3.9-5.6mmol/L). Most healthy individuals stay within the wider range most of the time. It’s typical to be out of the 70-140 mg/dl (3.9-7.8mmol/L) range for just 30 minutes to 2 hours a day. (7) Sharp upticks above your average glucose value or above the recommended range are commonly defined as spikes. These excursions look like steep mountains on your Lingo glucose graph. Your goal is to stay within the range of 70-140mg/dL (3.9-7.8mmol/L) most of the time and minimise the occurrence and severity of spikes. With Lingo, coaching prompts, your Lingo Count, and Lingo glucose graph can help you understand when you’re spiking so you can begin to discover the why behind your spikes and make changes to stay steady. What causes a glucose spike? A glucose spike typically happens after eating something particularly carb-heavy, especially if the carbohydrates are mostly simple carbs (e.g. white bread, pasta, bagel) and sugar. A glucose spike can also occur if you eat carbohydrates by themselves; pairing a carb with a source of protein or fat can help limit the glucose impact and reduce the risk of a spike. High-intensity exercise can also cause a glucose spike because it increases adrenaline (the fight-or-flight hormone), which signals to your body that it’s time to break down liver glycogen to glucose. This quick influx of fuel can spike your glucose, but as mentioned, a spike is a good thing in this instance. In the same way that exercise spikes your heart rate temporarily but provides benefit in the long run, a temporary blood glucose rise with exercise is an example of hormesis, which is a short-term stress that enables long-term adaptation. Other lifestyle factors may influence glucose, such as stress and poor sleep. Like with intense exercise, an increase in stress triggers the stress hormones cortisol and adrenaline, which can raise your glucose as your body needs quick energy to enter into fight-or-flight mode. Not getting enough sleep can disrupt your body’s ability to use glucose, causing future health concerns. (5) Over time this may lead to metabolic issues like prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, a disorder in which your body becomes resistant to insulin and loses its ability to properly remove glucose from the blood into your cells to use for energy. What does a glucose spike feel like? While a glucose spike may feel differently for each person, some common symptoms include tiredness, thirst, and hunger. Alternatively, some people may be asymptomatic and not notice when they are spiking. As your glucose rises, your body releases insulin to manage the extra glucose. As insulin circulates, your glucose rapidly lowers, often leading to a sharp crash. When this happens, your body typically craves more simple carbohydrates and sugar for a quick energy boost, and if you answer the craving, the spike-crash cycle continues. (6) Another major sign of a glucose spike followed by a crash is the feeling of being “hangry” (hungry + angry) in which you may feel irritable while also feeling hungry. This feeling often stems from a drop in glucose that signals an increase in ghrelin, known as the hunger hormone. This triggers a cascade of other hormones including the stress hormone cortisol, which explains why you feel irritable or impulsive in addition to physical hunger pangs. While hanger caused by low glucose can happen when you undereat or go too long in between meals, it can also happen in high glycaemic diets in which your glucose levels are constantly spiking and crashing. After you eat something with a lot of carbs and notice symptoms of a spike, incorporating movement may help temper the spike. A brisk 10-minute walk after eating may be all you need to prevent or lessen a glucose spike. Other quick bursts of exercise can also help, such as 10 minutes of bodyweight squats, jumping jacks, lunges, and calf raises. It’s a good idea to drink plenty of water and opt for something with more protein at your next meal. What is the impact of glucose spikes? In the short term, glucose spikes can cause hunger, cravings, feelings of fatigue, impact mood, and interfere with your sleep. While you’re likely to notice these effects as they're happening, there is impact behind the scenes, too. Glucose spikes can significantly impact the health of blood vessels and cells, with chronic spikes setting the stage for metabolic dysfunction. Elevated glucose increases your risk for developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, causes inflammation, and impacts your blood vessels, which can lead to cardiovascular issues like heart disease. (3,4) This is why it’s important to limit the number and size of glucose spikes that occur. Wearing a continuous glucose monitor like Lingo can help you learn about your glucose and track your spikes. Lingo provides real time data and coaching to help you understand how your habits impact your glucose and metabolic health. With Lingo, you’ll learn to limit the size and frequency spikes and make changes to improve your overall metabolic well-being, which can lead to more energy, better sleep, less hunger and cravings, and increased focus. How to avoid a glucose spike There are many ways to avoid a glucose spike naturally, and the best method is to be thoughtful with your food choices. Limit foods that are common sources of spikes such as refined carbohydrates, sugars, and sugary beverages, and instead opt for more complex carbohydrates that have fibre such as vegetables, fresh fruit, brown rice, quinoa, and whole grain bread. Even better, pair your carbohydrates with a source of protein and/or fat for a macronutrient-balanced option. Other lifestyle habits that can help keep your glucose steady include getting quality sleep, staying physically active, drinking plenty of water, managing stress, and limiting alcohol. A final note from Lingo While glucose spikes are normal and occur in healthy individuals, there are plenty of health benefits to managing your glucose and reducing the size and frequency of spikes. Maintaining steady glucose can help improve your metabolic health and give you more energy, better sleep, reduce hunger and cravings, and boost mental focus. Using a continuous glucose monitor like Lingo can help you understand your habits and patterns and work towards limiting glucose spikes. Lingo is not a medical device and not designed to treat or diagnose any disease or illness. If you have medical questions or concerns regarding your glucose, please contact your doctor.
By
Glucose 101

Frequently Asked Questions

The biosensor rests snugly against the back of your upper arm and is about the size of a 20p coin.
It's equipped with a tiny filament, less than 0.4mm wide, that rests just below your skin and continuously measures the glucose in your interstitial fluid (the fluid between your cells).
After a brief warmup period, your biosensor begins to measure glucose, every minute, day and night.  Readings will be sent to the Lingo app on your smartphone using Bluetooth.  
The Lingo biosensor is designed to be applied and used once with a single-use wear experience lasting up to 14 days.
When your wear experience is finished, you simply remove your biosensor by gently pulling back the adhesive and lift the biosensor off your arm.  For more information refer to this video
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© 2024 Abbott. All rights reserved. Lingo and related marks are marks of the Abbott group of companies. Other marks are the property of their respective owners.Lingo Sensing Technology Unlimited Company is a private Unlimited Company with registered number 731659. Our registered office is at 70 Sir John Rogersons Quay, Dublin 2, D02 R296, Ireland.The Lingo system is not intended for medical use and is not intended for use in screening, diagnosis, treatment, cure, mitigation, prevention, or monitoring of diseases, including diabetes. The Lingo programme does not guarantee that everyone will achieve the same results as individual responses may vary. It is best to speak to your doctor for advise on starting any diet or exercise regime or if you have an eating disorder or a history of eating disorders.Do not use Lingo if you are pregnant. Dietary advice and Lingo Counts may not be suitable for you if you are pregnant.